12 Things You Should Know Before Buying BJ’s Restaurants in 2012

I’m baaaaaack, happy New Year! Presented without graphics. I have been watching BJ’s Restaurants, Inc. for several months to see if the stock would fall from its Icarus like heights. The short story is that during the time I was on the sidelines, it has yet to come back to a level that seems more “attractive” to my somewhat trained investment eye. For my first post of 2012, I present to you my top 12 reasons why you would be better served to buy one of the menu items before buying the stock: Continue reading

On the Relationship Between "Increased" Food Prices & Restaurant Margins

I wrote the following from 10/27/2010-11/12/2010, but never published because I wanted to do some more work.  Alas, my ADD got the best of me, and that never really happened.  After paying $1.10 today to have Swiss cheese added to a buffalo chicken wrap at a diner in NJ, though, I’m again curious about the difference between wholesale and retail food price inflation.  So, without further adieu, here are my thoughts from then, which apparently are more valid today then they were just 6 months ago!

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Over the past few years – depending on the particular restaurant and time – I’ve been charged anywhere from $0.40 to $1.00 for adding cheese, tomatoes, etc to lunch or breakfast sandwiches.  I’m hardly an expert in agricultural commodity markets and only slightly less out of the loop re: the finer points of the restaurant business (but also hardly ignorant of either), so I assumed whatever, not a huge deal, I’m sure my patronage is padding restaurants’ margins, but its ~$0.50 and I’m (often) too lazy to make my own lunch so I’ll keep buying from delis/etc.

Enough about me and my elasticity of demand/food preparation inclination/etc…

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Ad Spending Outlook 2011: With Football As My Guide…

Walk through the parking lot at almost any NFL game and you’re likely to see everything from decades old beaters to brand-spankin’ new Porsche Turbos.  American Football appeals to virtually all Americans, from “the poor” to “the rich” and everyone in between.  Companies know this.  Advertising firms know this.  Networks know this.  The NFL knows this.  Not only do they know it, they embrace and exploit it.

By observing the commercials aired during NFL games – especially games like yesterday’s conference championships (the “semi-finals,” for those unfamiliar with American Football), we can observe current the ad spending habits within industries and firms.

Because I’m a bitter New York Giants fan and I was primarily watching the Chicago Bears v. Green Bay Packers NFC Championship game to see if I won a bet with @eradke and @ilkandcookies, I decided to keep track of every commercial that aired during the game.  Herein lie the results:

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